Lessons About Cynical Facebook Followers, Raising the Bar, and LensCrafters

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So I’m halfway to LaGuardia Airport yesterday, when I look out at a street sign to see where I was, and realize I can’t read it. That means one thing – Idiot-Peter left his glasses at home. My backup suitcase pair was on my counter in my apartment. Yes. I know that defeats the purpose of having a backup suitcase pair. Shut up.

Anyhow, it’s too late to go back to my apartment, so I figure everything will be fuzzy for the next 24 hours, until I get home. As I was waiting for my flight, on a whim, sent a tweet to LensCrafters.

 

 

Within five minutes, they’d followed me, asked me to DM specifics, and set me up with an appointment to get a replacement pair at a store close to my hotel in Chicago.

That’s awesome. But that’s not what this post is about.

When I posted on Facebook about having my new glasses and how awesome LensCrafters was to me, it was like I’d opened a box of bees. Examples from Tim Brechlin, Kellie Markowski, and Lisa Bonelli Mott, respectively:

Would LensCrafters have done that if you weren’t you, though, Peter? That’s the real test for customer service being at a level of creating Zombie Loyalists — that everyone, whether they have 166,000 or 166 Twitter followers, gets the same treatment.

Great for you…no way in HELL would that have done that for anyone else..

They wouldn’t have done that for average Joe Customer. I’m glad they helped you out but as someone who has been a customer before, they can’t always guarantee that type of turn around. Still nice that it worked out today & the frames look good too

Now then… If you permit me, allow me to tell you why all three of these comments are wrong…

Yes – I have a ton of twitter followers, and a lot of Facebook fans. (including a ton of cynical ones..) But what if you think about it this way:


If a brand goes out of their way to treat a customer with a large reach well, but then fails the regular customer, they’ve hurt themselves that much more. If you publicly set your own brand’s bar high with one person with reach, you’d be that much more of a fool not to do it with everyone.

shankman-comimagesimguploaderimages202015-05-13-17_29_23-8911c5d9e95f40982f9a7f5966cad826d0993ff1If LensCrafters went out of their way to help me, but their entire Twitter stream was full of miserable customers, they wouldn’t be in business for long. LensCrafters realizes that, and it’s my opinion that they value customer service to the point where they’re willing to treat every customer well, not just those with large followings.

As we move head-on into the customer experience economy, only those brands who value their customers and have empathy to solve their problems will survive. (TWEET THIS!)

I think LensCrafters is one of them, and I’m impressed by how they treat not only me, but their regular customers, as well.

Am I right? Thoughts? Do tell below. I’ll be able to read them, because I got my glasses! 🙂

This post was inspired by my friend Amber Powers, of Powers Digital Marketing, who was smart enough to realize and post about the concept of raising the bar for one and all.

Join the discussion 68 Comments

  • Cindy C. says:

    I see your point. I suspect that most people are speaking from their own experience, as you did. Did you see the positive responses in your stream as well? It would seem they do well across the board, if your comment stream is evidence.

  • Cindy C. says:

    I see your point. I suspect that most people are speaking from their own experience, as you did. Did you see the positive responses in your stream as well? It would seem they do well across the board, if your comment stream is evidence.

  • Cindy C. says:

    I see your point. I suspect that most people are speaking from their own experience, as you did. Did you see the positive responses in your stream as well? It would seem they do well across the board, if your comment stream is evidence.

  • Cindy C. says:

    I see your point. I suspect that most people are speaking from their own experience, as you did. Did you see the positive responses in your stream as well? It would seem they do well across the board, if your comment stream is evidence.

  • ldny says:

    I’m not usually so cynical, Peter, but the problem with your assessment of LensCrafters being so great because you were handled well is that their entire business model is based on “CUSTOM EYEGLASSES IN ABOUT AN HOUR.” In other words, they provided you with the service they advertise. That’s all. How did they go above and beyond, exactly? Because they setup an appointment for you via Twitter instead of you calling them? I’m willing to bet that the average LC customer doesn’t really care much about LC’s Twitter presence because LC isn’t some specialized tech company. They’re a retail chain and serve a wide variety of people from all classes and income levels. They are typically used by people who value the convenience of the store being on every corner and quick turnaround they promise.

    BTW – they didn’t value my business when I tried, over 2 days, to give it to them. They failed me at every level. The manager didn’t care when I complained either. So I took my business elsewhere. I didn’t tweet up a storm about it because I don’t really care about LC’s brand and whether their business lives or dies doesn’t matter to me. They are a faceless chain, that’s all. There’s nothing special, from what I can tell, about their operation model or customer policies. I thought they’d be a convenient choice to help me out of a bind where I needed a new pair quick, but they cost me 2 days of frustration instead. I only know that the one store I had this experience with didn’t care about my business and proved that by failing to do the job they were being paid to do and that they claimed to be able to do. Other locations might have been great. But I don’t think LC as a corporation or brand has any real concern for me (or you) personally and that’s fine. I don’t need every company I do business with to exceed my expectations – I just need them to do the job they claim to do. When a company proves, repeatedly, at every demonstrable level, that they value my business, those companies get my loud praises. But I’m just not seeing what exactly LC did that was so special besides respond to your tweet, which is expected, not special.

    • Tionia says:

      Remember that your not caring and not going up higher on the ladder to complain may help many people lose their jobs. Yes for you they may seem like a faceless chain and what they “didn’t do for you” what you expected was wrong but you dropped the ball… If you had gone higher up in the chain of command maybe then the manager and others who failed you would have been told by a higher up what a bad job they did and it made them lose a customer. And the biggest probvlem with that is if people like you DON’T complain until they get some sort of satisfaction or has gone as far as possible with not stasifaction then there could be dire repercussions. How many people would lose their jobs if that store keeps treating customers like they did you? Sure you may not care but I am sure there are people workking there that do care! Also what if that is a store that serves people who for some reasons can’t get or use another store and it closes because people do not let the company know when they didn’t value your business when you tried to give it to them…
      Too many people throw their hands up in the air believing that they can’t do anything to help and then others are harmed.

      That is one thing about this country that makes me wish this country could change some things. We are a nation that is all about ourselves… Too many people only care about their own well being and don’t consider the great of everyone, only themselves…
      Yes it is all about ME ME ME in this country and that is what I wish would change!

      If we don’t take care of each other or at least consider each other this country will end up being even more hated by the world and we will fall apart!!!

  • ldny says:

    I’m not usually so cynical, Peter, but the problem with your assessment of LensCrafters being so great because you were handled well is that their entire business model is based on “CUSTOM EYEGLASSES IN ABOUT AN HOUR.” In other words, they provided you with the service they advertise. That’s all. How did they go above and beyond, exactly? Because they setup an appointment for you via Twitter instead of you calling them? I’m willing to bet that the average LC customer doesn’t really care much about LC’s Twitter presence because LC isn’t some specialized tech company. They’re a retail chain and serve a wide variety of people from all classes and income levels. They are typically used by people who value the convenience of the store being on every corner and quick turnaround they promise.

    BTW – they didn’t value my business when I tried, over 2 days, to give it to them. They failed me at every level. The manager didn’t care when I complained either. So I took my business elsewhere. I didn’t tweet up a storm about it because I don’t really care about LC’s brand and whether their business lives or dies doesn’t matter to me. They are a faceless chain, that’s all. There’s nothing special, from what I can tell, about their operation model or customer policies. I thought they’d be a convenient choice to help me out of a bind where I needed a new pair quick, but they cost me 2 days of frustration instead. I only know that the one store I had this experience with didn’t care about my business and proved that by failing to do the job they were being paid to do and that they claimed to be able to do. Other locations might have been great. But I don’t think LC as a corporation or brand has any real concern for me (or you) personally and that’s fine. I don’t need every company I do business with to exceed my expectations – I just need them to do the job they claim to do. When a company proves, repeatedly, at every demonstrable level, that they value my business, those companies get my loud praises. But I’m just not seeing what exactly LC did that was so special besides respond to your tweet, which is expected, not special.

    • Tionia says:

      Remember that your not caring and not going up higher on the ladder to complain may help many people lose their jobs. Yes for you they may seem like a faceless chain and what they “didn’t do for you” what you expected was wrong but you dropped the ball… If you had gone higher up in the chain of command maybe then the manager and others who failed you would have been told by a higher up what a bad job they did and it made them lose a customer. And the biggest probvlem with that is if people like you DON’T complain until they get some sort of satisfaction or has gone as far as possible with not stasifaction then there could be dire repercussions. How many people would lose their jobs if that store keeps treating customers like they did you? Sure you may not care but I am sure there are people workking there that do care! Also what if that is a store that serves people who for some reasons can’t get or use another store and it closes because people do not let the company know when they didn’t value your business when you tried to give it to them…
      Too many people throw their hands up in the air believing that they can’t do anything to help and then others are harmed.

      That is one thing about this country that makes me wish this country could change some things. We are a nation that is all about ourselves… Too many people only care about their own well being and don’t consider the great of everyone, only themselves…
      Yes it is all about ME ME ME in this country and that is what I wish would change!

      If we don’t take care of each other or at least consider each other this country will end up being even more hated by the world and we will fall apart!!!

  • ldny says:

    I’m not usually so cynical, Peter, but the problem with your assessment of LensCrafters being so great because you were handled well is that their entire business model is based on “CUSTOM EYEGLASSES IN ABOUT AN HOUR.” In other words, they provided you with the service they advertise. That’s all. How did they go above and beyond, exactly? Because they setup an appointment for you via Twitter instead of you calling them? I’m willing to bet that the average LC customer doesn’t really care much about LC’s Twitter presence because LC isn’t some specialized tech company. They’re a retail chain and serve a wide variety of people from all classes and income levels. They are typically used by people who value the convenience of the store being on every corner and quick turnaround they promise.

    BTW – they didn’t value my business when I tried, over 2 days, to give it to them. They failed me at every level. The manager didn’t care when I complained either. So I took my business elsewhere. I didn’t tweet up a storm about it because I don’t really care about LC’s brand and whether their business lives or dies doesn’t matter to me. They are a faceless chain, that’s all. There’s nothing special, from what I can tell, about their operation model or customer policies. I thought they’d be a convenient choice to help me out of a bind where I needed a new pair quick, but they cost me 2 days of frustration instead. I only know that the one store I had this experience with didn’t care about my business and proved that by failing to do the job they were being paid to do and that they claimed to be able to do. Other locations might have been great. But I don’t think LC as a corporation or brand has any real concern for me (or you) personally and that’s fine. I don’t need every company I do business with to exceed my expectations – I just need them to do the job they claim to do. When a company proves, repeatedly, at every demonstrable level, that they value my business, those companies get my loud praises. But I’m just not seeing what exactly LC did that was so special besides respond to your tweet, which is expected, not special.

    • Tionia says:

      Remember that your not caring and not going up higher on the ladder to complain may help many people lose their jobs. Yes for you they may seem like a faceless chain and what they “didn’t do for you” what you expected was wrong but you dropped the ball… If you had gone higher up in the chain of command maybe then the manager and others who failed you would have been told by a higher up what a bad job they did and it made them lose a customer. And the biggest probvlem with that is if people like you DON’T complain until they get some sort of satisfaction or has gone as far as possible with not stasifaction then there could be dire repercussions. How many people would lose their jobs if that store keeps treating customers like they did you? Sure you may not care but I am sure there are people workking there that do care! Also what if that is a store that serves people who for some reasons can’t get or use another store and it closes because people do not let the company know when they didn’t value your business when you tried to give it to them…
      Too many people throw their hands up in the air believing that they can’t do anything to help and then others are harmed.

      That is one thing about this country that makes me wish this country could change some things. We are a nation that is all about ourselves… Too many people only care about their own well being and don’t consider the great of everyone, only themselves…
      Yes it is all about ME ME ME in this country and that is what I wish would change!

      If we don’t take care of each other or at least consider each other this country will end up being even more hated by the world and we will fall apart!!!

  • ldny says:

    I’m not usually so cynical, Peter, but the problem with your assessment of LensCrafters being so great because you were handled well is that their entire business model is based on “CUSTOM EYEGLASSES IN ABOUT AN HOUR.” In other words, they provided you with the service they advertise. That’s all. How did they go above and beyond, exactly? Because they setup an appointment for you via Twitter instead of you calling them? I’m willing to bet that the average LC customer doesn’t really care much about LC’s Twitter presence because LC isn’t some specialized tech company. They’re a retail chain and serve a wide variety of people from all classes and income levels. They are typically used by people who value the convenience of the store being on every corner and quick turnaround they promise.

    BTW – they didn’t value my business when I tried, over 2 days, to give it to them. They failed me at every level. The manager didn’t care when I complained either. So I took my business elsewhere. I didn’t tweet up a storm about it because I don’t really care about LC’s brand and whether their business lives or dies doesn’t matter to me. They are a faceless chain, that’s all. There’s nothing special, from what I can tell, about their operation model or customer policies. I thought they’d be a convenient choice to help me out of a bind where I needed a new pair quick, but they cost me 2 days of frustration instead. I only know that the one store I had this experience with didn’t care about my business and proved that by failing to do the job they were being paid to do and that they claimed to be able to do. Other locations might have been great. But I don’t think LC as a corporation or brand has any real concern for me (or you) personally and that’s fine. I don’t need every company I do business with to exceed my expectations – I just need them to do the job they claim to do. When a company proves, repeatedly, at every demonstrable level, that they value my business, those companies get my loud praises. But I’m just not seeing what exactly LC did that was so special besides respond to your tweet, which is expected, not special.

    • Tionia says:

      Remember that your not caring and not going up higher on the ladder to complain may help many people lose their jobs. Yes for you they may seem like a faceless chain and what they “didn’t do for you” what you expected was wrong but you dropped the ball… If you had gone higher up in the chain of command maybe then the manager and others who failed you would have been told by a higher up what a bad job they did and it made them lose a customer. And the biggest probvlem with that is if people like you DON’T complain until they get some sort of satisfaction or has gone as far as possible with not stasifaction then there could be dire repercussions. How many people would lose their jobs if that store keeps treating customers like they did you? Sure you may not care but I am sure there are people workking there that do care! Also what if that is a store that serves people who for some reasons can’t get or use another store and it closes because people do not let the company know when they didn’t value your business when you tried to give it to them…
      Too many people throw their hands up in the air believing that they can’t do anything to help and then others are harmed.

      That is one thing about this country that makes me wish this country could change some things. We are a nation that is all about ourselves… Too many people only care about their own well being and don’t consider the great of everyone, only themselves…
      Yes it is all about ME ME ME in this country and that is what I wish would change!

      If we don’t take care of each other or at least consider each other this country will end up being even more hated by the world and we will fall apart!!!

  • ldny says:

    I’m not usually so cynical, Peter, but the problem with your assessment of LensCrafters being so great because you were handled well is that their entire business model is based on “CUSTOM EYEGLASSES IN ABOUT AN HOUR.” In other words, they provided you with the service they advertise. That’s all. How did they go above and beyond, exactly? Because they setup an appointment for you via Twitter instead of you calling them? I’m willing to bet that the average LC customer doesn’t really care much about LC’s Twitter presence because LC isn’t some specialized tech company. They’re a retail chain and serve a wide variety of people from all classes and income levels. They are typically used by people who value the convenience of the store being on every corner and quick turnaround they promise.

    BTW – they didn’t value my business when I tried, over 2 days, to give it to them. They failed me at every level. The manager didn’t care when I complained either. So I took my business elsewhere. I didn’t tweet up a storm about it because I don’t really care about LC’s brand and whether their business lives or dies doesn’t matter to me. They are a faceless chain, that’s all. There’s nothing special, from what I can tell, about their operation model or customer policies. I thought they’d be a convenient choice to help me out of a bind where I needed a new pair quick, but they cost me 2 days of frustration instead. I only know that the one store I had this experience with didn’t care about my business and proved that by failing to do the job they were being paid to do and that they claimed to be able to do. Other locations might have been great. But I don’t think LC as a corporation or brand has any real concern for me (or you) personally and that’s fine. I don’t need every company I do business with to exceed my expectations – I just need them to do the job they claim to do. When a company proves, repeatedly, at every demonstrable level, that they value my business, those companies get my loud praises. But I’m just not seeing what exactly LC did that was so special besides respond to your tweet, which is expected, not special.

    • Tionia says:

      Remember that your not caring and not going up higher on the ladder to complain may help many people lose their jobs. Yes for you they may seem like a faceless chain and what they “didn’t do for you” what you expected was wrong but you dropped the ball… If you had gone higher up in the chain of command maybe then the manager and others who failed you would have been told by a higher up what a bad job they did and it made them lose a customer. And the biggest probvlem with that is if people like you DON’T complain until they get some sort of satisfaction or has gone as far as possible with not stasifaction then there could be dire repercussions. How many people would lose their jobs if that store keeps treating customers like they did you? Sure you may not care but I am sure there are people workking there that do care! Also what if that is a store that serves people who for some reasons can’t get or use another store and it closes because people do not let the company know when they didn’t value your business when you tried to give it to them…
      Too many people throw their hands up in the air believing that they can’t do anything to help and then others are harmed.

      That is one thing about this country that makes me wish this country could change some things. We are a nation that is all about ourselves… Too many people only care about their own well being and don’t consider the great of everyone, only themselves…
      Yes it is all about ME ME ME in this country and that is what I wish would change!

      If we don’t take care of each other or at least consider each other this country will end up being even more hated by the world and we will fall apart!!!

  • Kellie Mankowski says:

    Oh Peter…you live in a fantasy world that customer service ranks the same for all. I’ve been there…big brand..treats people like you very differently. I challenge you to go under and alias and tweet about missing your glasses and see how fast you get your new script. LOL. Love you PS but totally disagree when it comes to real life in the social media world.

    • shankman says:

      I know this won’t change your mind, but what the heck…

      I’m Platinum with Starwood Hotels. (Sheraton, Westin, W, etc.) Last night, I was staying at the Westin Michigan Avenue, and didn’t realize that the company to whom I was speaking had booked my reservation, instead of my assistant. I.e., my reservation didn’t have my loyalty number attached.

      When I checked in, they said, “OK, we have you on a nice high floor with two double beds.” I said, “any chance of a King?” To which the front desk person looked, and said, “sure, happy to do it, since we have it available.”

      Then he said, “Are you a member of our preferred guest program?”

      I was like, “wait, you don’t have my loyalty number?”

      My point is, here was a customer service rep who got me a nicer room (a larger bed,) simply because I asked. He didn’t know me from Adam when he did it.

      Not saying big influencers don’t carry weight, but also, don’t assume all companies treat “regular people” like crap.

      • ldny says:

        No, not all companies. But you posted specifically about LensCrafters. Starwood has a fantastic customer service reputation. They cater to a certain type of customer and that’s expected. Overall, they do very well. When you’re checking into the Westin, you’re already considered a VIP. The average schmo isn’t staying at the Westin. The average schmo IS going to LensCrafters. Marriott also exceeds expectations, for me at least. Even when I stay at their low-end properties (like Fairfield Inn, which I actually prefer in many cities), the service I’ve always gotten at those properties has been amazing, even long before I was higher up in the Rewards ranks. The way Marriott treated me when a $99 room was the norm is why I have no qualms about booking $500/night room now. It’s not just about who knocks it out of the park, but also about what the basic expectation is for the target market of that company. I know you know all of these things. It’s just baffling as to why you’re so defensive about LC in particular. You had a very ordinary experience where they did exactly what they advertise and you’re making it sound like they rolled out the red carpet for you. I’m just not seeing it.

        • shankman says:

          But the point of my comment was that when I checked into Westin this time, I WASN’T considered a VIP. I wasn’t considered anything, because m SPG # wasn’t attached, yet the front desk employee STILL found me a better room when I asked – THAT’S my point – He didn’t know who I was at all – which is why he asked if I was a member of the SPG loyalty program.

          And you’re right – LC DID do exactly what they advertised – but they did it with a smile, and not one iota of annoyance – they were friendly and inviting, and let’s face it – that’s a lot more than we expect from almost any customer interaction – Which might be why I’m so pleased, because I my expectations were not high in the slightest – as we’ve been trained.

          • ldny says:

            Sorry if I wasn’t clear. I get that they didn’t know who you were, specifically, and that your status as Platinum wasn’t known to them. my point was that anyone checking into a Westin is already assumed to be a high value target and is treated accordingly. It’s not a Red Roof Inn. It’s Westin. It’s a luxury brand already.

      • Kellie Mankowski says:

        I get loyalty 100%!!! People who are dedicated to a brand and spend money to stay with that brand deserve a level of treatment a little above someone who books on “priceline”. Maybe I am not giving you a fair shake cause I know your name…LOL. although….when I worked at a certain airline…when folks like you tweeted…they got preferential treatment. It’s just how it goes. Hummmmm there’s so much room to grow here. Congrats on your new addition. Thanks for responding to my comments…you’re real. 🙂

    • shankman says:

      I know this won’t change your mind, but what the heck…

      I’m Platinum with Starwood Hotels. (Sheraton, Westin, W, etc.) Last night, I was staying at the Westin Michigan Avenue, and didn’t realize that the company to whom I was speaking had booked my reservation, instead of my assistant. I.e., my reservation didn’t have my loyalty number attached.

      When I checked in, they said, “OK, we have you on a nice high floor with two double beds.” I said, “any chance of a King?” To which the front desk person looked, and said, “sure, happy to do it, since we have it available.”

      Then he said, “Are you a member of our preferred guest program?”

      I was like, “wait, you don’t have my loyalty number?”

      My point is, here was a customer service rep who got me a nicer room (a larger bed,) simply because I asked. He didn’t know me from Adam when he did it.

      Not saying big influencers don’t carry weight, but also, don’t assume all companies treat “regular people” like crap.

      • ldny says:

        No, not all companies. But you posted specifically about LensCrafters. Starwood has a fantastic customer service reputation. They cater to a certain type of customer and that’s expected. Overall, they do very well. When you’re checking into the Westin, you’re already considered a VIP. The average schmo isn’t staying at the Westin. The average schmo IS going to LensCrafters. Marriott also exceeds expectations, for me at least. Even when I stay at their low-end properties (like Fairfield Inn, which I actually prefer in many cities), the service I’ve always gotten at those properties has been amazing, even long before I was higher up in the Rewards ranks. The way Marriott treated me when a $99 room was the norm is why I have no qualms about booking $500/night room now. It’s not just about who knocks it out of the park, but also about what the basic expectation is for the target market of that company. I know you know all of these things. It’s just baffling as to why you’re so defensive about LC in particular. You had a very ordinary experience where they did exactly what they advertise and you’re making it sound like they rolled out the red carpet for you. I’m just not seeing it.

        • shankman says:

          But the point of my comment was that when I checked into Westin this time, I WASN’T considered a VIP. I wasn’t considered anything, because m SPG # wasn’t attached, yet the front desk employee STILL found me a better room when I asked – THAT’S my point – He didn’t know who I was at all – which is why he asked if I was a member of the SPG loyalty program.

          And you’re right – LC DID do exactly what they advertised – but they did it with a smile, and not one iota of annoyance – they were friendly and inviting, and let’s face it – that’s a lot more than we expect from almost any customer interaction – Which might be why I’m so pleased, because I my expectations were not high in the slightest – as we’ve been trained.

          • ldny says:

            Sorry if I wasn’t clear. I get that they didn’t know who you were, specifically, and that your status as Platinum wasn’t known to them. my point was that anyone checking into a Westin is already assumed to be a high value target and is treated accordingly. It’s not a Red Roof Inn. It’s Westin. It’s a luxury brand already.

      • Kellie Mankowski says:

        I get loyalty 100%!!! People who are dedicated to a brand and spend money to stay with that brand deserve a level of treatment a little above someone who books on “priceline”. Maybe I am not giving you a fair shake cause I know your name…LOL. although….when I worked at a certain airline…when folks like you tweeted…they got preferential treatment. It’s just how it goes. Hummmmm there’s so much room to grow here. Congrats on your new addition. Thanks for responding to my comments…you’re real. 🙂

    • shankman says:

      I know this won’t change your mind, but what the heck…

      I’m Platinum with Starwood Hotels. (Sheraton, Westin, W, etc.) Last night, I was staying at the Westin Michigan Avenue, and didn’t realize that the company to whom I was speaking had booked my reservation, instead of my assistant. I.e., my reservation didn’t have my loyalty number attached.

      When I checked in, they said, “OK, we have you on a nice high floor with two double beds.” I said, “any chance of a King?” To which the front desk person looked, and said, “sure, happy to do it, since we have it available.”

      Then he said, “Are you a member of our preferred guest program?”

      I was like, “wait, you don’t have my loyalty number?”

      My point is, here was a customer service rep who got me a nicer room (a larger bed,) simply because I asked. He didn’t know me from Adam when he did it.

      Not saying big influencers don’t carry weight, but also, don’t assume all companies treat “regular people” like crap.

      • ldny says:

        No, not all companies. But you posted specifically about LensCrafters. Starwood has a fantastic customer service reputation. They cater to a certain type of customer and that’s expected. Overall, they do very well. When you’re checking into the Westin, you’re already considered a VIP. The average schmo isn’t staying at the Westin. The average schmo IS going to LensCrafters. Marriott also exceeds expectations, for me at least. Even when I stay at their low-end properties (like Fairfield Inn, which I actually prefer in many cities), the service I’ve always gotten at those properties has been amazing, even long before I was higher up in the Rewards ranks. The way Marriott treated me when a $99 room was the norm is why I have no qualms about booking $500/night room now. It’s not just about who knocks it out of the park, but also about what the basic expectation is for the target market of that company. I know you know all of these things. It’s just baffling as to why you’re so defensive about LC in particular. You had a very ordinary experience where they did exactly what they advertise and you’re making it sound like they rolled out the red carpet for you. I’m just not seeing it.

        • shankman says:

          But the point of my comment was that when I checked into Westin this time, I WASN’T considered a VIP. I wasn’t considered anything, because m SPG # wasn’t attached, yet the front desk employee STILL found me a better room when I asked – THAT’S my point – He didn’t know who I was at all – which is why he asked if I was a member of the SPG loyalty program.

          And you’re right – LC DID do exactly what they advertised – but they did it with a smile, and not one iota of annoyance – they were friendly and inviting, and let’s face it – that’s a lot more than we expect from almost any customer interaction – Which might be why I’m so pleased, because I my expectations were not high in the slightest – as we’ve been trained.

          • ldny says:

            Sorry if I wasn’t clear. I get that they didn’t know who you were, specifically, and that your status as Platinum wasn’t known to them. my point was that anyone checking into a Westin is already assumed to be a high value target and is treated accordingly. It’s not a Red Roof Inn. It’s Westin. It’s a luxury brand already.

        • shankman says:

          But the point of my comment was that when I checked into Westin this time, I WASN’T considered a VIP. I wasn’t considered anything, because m SPG # wasn’t attached, yet the front desk employee STILL found me a better room when I asked – THAT’S my point – He didn’t know who I was at all – which is why he asked if I was a member of the SPG loyalty program.

          And you’re right – LC DID do exactly what they advertised – but they did it with a smile, and not one iota of annoyance – they were friendly and inviting, and let’s face it – that’s a lot more than we expect from almost any customer interaction – Which might be why I’m so pleased, because I my expectations were not high in the slightest – as we’ve been trained.

          • ldny says:

            Sorry if I wasn’t clear. I get that they didn’t know who you were, specifically, and that your status as Platinum wasn’t known to them. my point was that anyone checking into a Westin is already assumed to be a high value target and is treated accordingly. It’s not a Red Roof Inn. It’s Westin. It’s a luxury brand already.

        • shankman says:

          But the point of my comment was that when I checked into Westin this time, I WASN’T considered a VIP. I wasn’t considered anything, because m SPG # wasn’t attached, yet the front desk employee STILL found me a better room when I asked – THAT’S my point – He didn’t know who I was at all – which is why he asked if I was a member of the SPG loyalty program.

          And you’re right – LC DID do exactly what they advertised – but they did it with a smile, and not one iota of annoyance – they were friendly and inviting, and let’s face it – that’s a lot more than we expect from almost any customer interaction – Which might be why I’m so pleased, because I my expectations were not high in the slightest – as we’ve been trained.

          • ldny says:

            Sorry if I wasn’t clear. I get that they didn’t know who you were, specifically, and that your status as Platinum wasn’t known to them. my point was that anyone checking into a Westin is already assumed to be a high value target and is treated accordingly. It’s not a Red Roof Inn. It’s Westin. It’s a luxury brand already.

      • Kellie Mankowski says:

        I get loyalty 100%!!! People who are dedicated to a brand and spend money to stay with that brand deserve a level of treatment a little above someone who books on “priceline”. Maybe I am not giving you a fair shake cause I know your name…LOL. although….when I worked at a certain airline…when folks like you tweeted…they got preferential treatment. It’s just how it goes. Hummmmm there’s so much room to grow here. Congrats on your new addition. Thanks for responding to my comments…you’re real. 🙂

      • Kellie Mankowski says:

        I get loyalty 100%!!! People who are dedicated to a brand and spend money to stay with that brand deserve a level of treatment a little above someone who books on “priceline”. Maybe I am not giving you a fair shake cause I know your name…LOL. although….when I worked at a certain airline…when folks like you tweeted…they got preferential treatment. It’s just how it goes. Hummmmm there’s so much room to grow here. Congrats on your new addition. Thanks for responding to my comments…you’re real. 🙂

      • Kellie Mankowski says:

        I get loyalty 100%!!! People who are dedicated to a brand and spend money to stay with that brand deserve a level of treatment a little above someone who books on “priceline”. Maybe I am not giving you a fair shake cause I know your name…LOL. although….when I worked at a certain airline…when folks like you tweeted…they got preferential treatment. It’s just how it goes. Hummmmm there’s so much room to grow here. Congrats on your new addition. Thanks for responding to my comments…you’re real. 🙂

  • Kellie Mankowski says:

    To be very candid and frank…I worked for a major airline and when we saw elites, celebrities, athletes, and/ or Peter Shankman….we made sure they got what they needed. I am sorry to seem so jaded about your Lenscrafters experience, but I just don’t buy it would happen to the average Joe. Suffice it to say….can’t get that excited about your post about the service you received. Great for you that you got your specs as I wear them and would DIE without them. I am just not so feel good about your story. You’re a celebrity…hopefully in the future, social media will be about customer service all around and not just quieting those folks with thousand of followers to keep the feeds “clean” and “neat”. I am quite sure you know what I mean. Peace out Peter Shankman.

  • Kellie Mankowski says:

    To be very candid and frank…I worked for a major airline and when we saw elites, celebrities, athletes, and/ or Peter Shankman….we made sure they got what they needed. I am sorry to seem so jaded about your Lenscrafters experience, but I just don’t buy it would happen to the average Joe. Suffice it to say….can’t get that excited about your post about the service you received. Great for you that you got your specs as I wear them and would DIE without them. I am just not so feel good about your story. You’re a celebrity…hopefully in the future, social media will be about customer service all around and not just quieting those folks with thousand of followers to keep the feeds “clean” and “neat”. I am quite sure you know what I mean. Peace out Peter Shankman.

  • Kellie Mankowski says:

    To be very candid and frank…I worked for a major airline and when we saw elites, celebrities, athletes, and/ or Peter Shankman….we made sure they got what they needed. I am sorry to seem so jaded about your Lenscrafters experience, but I just don’t buy it would happen to the average Joe. Suffice it to say….can’t get that excited about your post about the service you received. Great for you that you got your specs as I wear them and would DIE without them. I am just not so feel good about your story. You’re a celebrity…hopefully in the future, social media will be about customer service all around and not just quieting those folks with thousand of followers to keep the feeds “clean” and “neat”. I am quite sure you know what I mean. Peace out Peter Shankman.

  • Andrew Poretz says:

    I had meh experiences with Lenscrafters and, in fact, walked out of their Herald Square store recently, never to return, after they surprised me while filling out paperwork (because their new system failed to carry over existing customers) with a price for an exam double the last one. I found a deal on Living Social and got an exam and glasses from Cohen’s for only $50 more than Lenscrafters wanted for the exam.

  • Andrew Poretz says:

    I had meh experiences with Lenscrafters and, in fact, walked out of their Herald Square store recently, never to return, after they surprised me while filling out paperwork (because their new system failed to carry over existing customers) with a price for an exam double the last one. I found a deal on Living Social and got an exam and glasses from Cohen’s for only $50 more than Lenscrafters wanted for the exam.

  • Andrew Poretz says:

    I had meh experiences with Lenscrafters and, in fact, walked out of their Herald Square store recently, never to return, after they surprised me while filling out paperwork (because their new system failed to carry over existing customers) with a price for an exam double the last one. I found a deal on Living Social and got an exam and glasses from Cohen’s for only $50 more than Lenscrafters wanted for the exam.

  • Andrew Poretz says:

    I had meh experiences with Lenscrafters and, in fact, walked out of their Herald Square store recently, never to return, after they surprised me while filling out paperwork (because their new system failed to carry over existing customers) with a price for an exam double the last one. I found a deal on Living Social and got an exam and glasses from Cohen’s for only $50 more than Lenscrafters wanted for the exam.

  • Andrew Poretz says:

    I had meh experiences with Lenscrafters and, in fact, walked out of their Herald Square store recently, never to return, after they surprised me while filling out paperwork (because their new system failed to carry over existing customers) with a price for an exam double the last one. I found a deal on Living Social and got an exam and glasses from Cohen’s for only $50 more than Lenscrafters wanted for the exam.

  • Susan F Heywood says:

    I can be cynical, but not in this case. Here’s why” You mentioned that you were followed and contacted within five minutes. This means two things: 1) They have a system in place to monitor the Twitter stream for mentions and to respond to them; and 2)they did not follow you before and, thus, did not know how many followers you have or even that you’ve written a book on customer engagement. You are right, a company that sets the bar high must be consistent in keeping its brand promise,

    • BeaZea says:

      You are so right Susan. The fact that they have a system in place that both listens and responds already merits them double the credit. The fact that they also take action gives them another credit. As for PS being a celebrity, that just gave them free publicity. I have a feeling that The system is in place so they can respond to every Joe Schmoe.
      I consider this great customer service.

  • Susan F Heywood says:

    I can be cynical, but not in this case. Here’s why” You mentioned that you were followed and contacted within five minutes. This means two things: 1) They have a system in place to monitor the Twitter stream for mentions and to respond to them; and 2)they did not follow you before and, thus, did not know how many followers you have or even that you’ve written a book on customer engagement. You are right, a company that sets the bar high must be consistent in keeping its brand promise,

    • BeaZea says:

      You are so right Susan. The fact that they have a system in place that both listens and responds already merits them double the credit. The fact that they also take action gives them another credit. As for PS being a celebrity, that just gave them free publicity. I have a feeling that The system is in place so they can respond to every Joe Schmoe.
      I consider this great customer service.

  • Susan F Heywood says:

    I can be cynical, but not in this case. Here’s why” You mentioned that you were followed and contacted within five minutes. This means two things: 1) They have a system in place to monitor the Twitter stream for mentions and to respond to them; and 2)they did not follow you before and, thus, did not know how many followers you have or even that you’ve written a book on customer engagement. You are right, a company that sets the bar high must be consistent in keeping its brand promise,

    • BeaZea says:

      You are so right Susan. The fact that they have a system in place that both listens and responds already merits them double the credit. The fact that they also take action gives them another credit. As for PS being a celebrity, that just gave them free publicity. I have a feeling that The system is in place so they can respond to every Joe Schmoe.
      I consider this great customer service.

  • Susan F Heywood says:

    I can be cynical, but not in this case. Here’s why” You mentioned that you were followed and contacted within five minutes. This means two things: 1) They have a system in place to monitor the Twitter stream for mentions and to respond to them; and 2)they did not follow you before and, thus, did not know how many followers you have or even that you’ve written a book on customer engagement. You are right, a company that sets the bar high must be consistent in keeping its brand promise,

    • BeaZea says:

      You are so right Susan. The fact that they have a system in place that both listens and responds already merits them double the credit. The fact that they also take action gives them another credit. As for PS being a celebrity, that just gave them free publicity. I have a feeling that The system is in place so they can respond to every Joe Schmoe.
      I consider this great customer service.

  • Susan F Heywood says:

    I can be cynical, but not in this case. Here’s why” You mentioned that you were followed and contacted within five minutes. This means two things: 1) They have a system in place to monitor the Twitter stream for mentions and to respond to them; and 2)they did not follow you before and, thus, did not know how many followers you have or even that you’ve written a book on customer engagement. You are right, a company that sets the bar high must be consistent in keeping its brand promise,

    • BeaZea says:

      You are so right Susan. The fact that they have a system in place that both listens and responds already merits them double the credit. The fact that they also take action gives them another credit. As for PS being a celebrity, that just gave them free publicity. I have a feeling that The system is in place so they can respond to every Joe Schmoe.
      I consider this great customer service.

  • callgirlsinjalandhar says:

    I had experience with bellows LensCrafters and I actually left the Herald Square store recently , never to return , after which surprised me to fill out the paperwork , and ( due to the new system did not perform to existing customers ) to the price of the exam twice last . I found a number of social life and get exam and glasses for only $ Cohen LensCrafters wanted more than 50 tests .

  • callgirlsinjalandhar says:

    I had experience with bellows LensCrafters and I actually left the Herald Square store recently , never to return , after which surprised me to fill out the paperwork , and ( due to the new system did not perform to existing customers ) to the price of the exam twice last . I found a number of social life and get exam and glasses for only $ Cohen LensCrafters wanted more than 50 tests .

  • callgirlsinjalandhar says:

    I had experience with bellows LensCrafters and I actually left the Herald Square store recently , never to return , after which surprised me to fill out the paperwork , and ( due to the new system did not perform to existing customers ) to the price of the exam twice last . I found a number of social life and get exam and glasses for only $ Cohen LensCrafters wanted more than 50 tests .

  • callgirlsinjalandhar says:

    I had experience with bellows LensCrafters and I actually left the Herald Square store recently , never to return , after which surprised me to fill out the paperwork , and ( due to the new system did not perform to existing customers ) to the price of the exam twice last . I found a number of social life and get exam and glasses for only $ Cohen LensCrafters wanted more than 50 tests .

  • callgirlsinjalandhar says:

    I had experience with bellows LensCrafters and I actually left the Herald Square store recently , never to return , after which surprised me to fill out the paperwork , and ( due to the new system did not perform to existing customers ) to the price of the exam twice last . I found a number of social life and get exam and glasses for only $ Cohen LensCrafters wanted more than 50 tests .

  • Jamie King says:

    I’m an average Joe and #AirCanada and #Delta treated me as if I were ‘you’ when it was close to midnight and something had gone wrong with my ticketing. With the door closing on the last flight out, a team of tired but dedicated staff, (front and back office,) got me on the plane just in time. I even made a Keek about it and yeah, I give them both a shout out in this comment. I now can’t help but think their names when booking tickets for flights in America. Customer experience economy in full effect.

  • Jamie King says:

    I’m an average Joe and #AirCanada and #Delta treated me as if I were ‘you’ when it was close to midnight and something had gone wrong with my ticketing. With the door closing on the last flight out, a team of tired but dedicated staff, (front and back office,) got me on the plane just in time. I even made a Keek about it and yeah, I give them both a shout out in this comment. I now can’t help but think their names when booking tickets for flights in America. Customer experience economy in full effect.

  • Jamie King says:

    I’m an average Joe and #AirCanada and #Delta treated me as if I were ‘you’ when it was close to midnight and something had gone wrong with my ticketing. With the door closing on the last flight out, a team of tired but dedicated staff, (front and back office,) got me on the plane just in time. I even made a Keek about it and yeah, I give them both a shout out in this comment. I now can’t help but think their names when booking tickets for flights in America. Customer experience economy in full effect.

  • Jamie King says:

    I’m an average Joe and #AirCanada and #Delta treated me as if I were ‘you’ when it was close to midnight and something had gone wrong with my ticketing. With the door closing on the last flight out, a team of tired but dedicated staff, (front and back office,) got me on the plane just in time. I even made a Keek about it and yeah, I give them both a shout out in this comment. I now can’t help but think their names when booking tickets for flights in America. Customer experience economy in full effect.

  • Jamie King says:

    I’m an average Joe and #AirCanada and #Delta treated me as if I were ‘you’ when it was close to midnight and something had gone wrong with my ticketing. With the door closing on the last flight out, a team of tired but dedicated staff, (front and back office,) got me on the plane just in time. I even made a Keek about it and yeah, I give them both a shout out in this comment. I now can’t help but think their names when booking tickets for flights in America. Customer experience economy in full effect.

  • Gibby23Roarof84 says:

    When we do travel, American Airlines has my business. Forever.

  • Gibby23Roarof84 says:

    When we do travel, American Airlines has my business. Forever.

  • Gibby23Roarof84 says:

    When we do travel, American Airlines has my business. Forever.

  • Gibby23Roarof84 says:

    When we do travel, American Airlines has my business. Forever.

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