How would you handle this crisis?

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A first-time tandem skydiver was killed on Saturday when she fell from her harness.

Using the comments section below, feel free to answer any or all of the following questions:

1) What do you say to a first-timer who is now thinking of cancelling his or her reservation for a tandem skydive?

2) The USPA keeps detailed statistics that show that Tandem skydiving, while risky, is still incredibly safe comparitively. How do you put that forth to a student?

3) If you were to start a safety campaign or poster highlighting why a Tandem Skydive is still an amazing thrill and something everyone should try, what would you do?

Join the discussion 119 Comments

  • Nancy Fox says:

    Being the guy who takes the photo is a good one. Often they’ll reciprocate, although that’s not the point.

  • Nancy Fox says:

    Being the guy who takes the photo is a good one. Often they’ll reciprocate, although that’s not the point.

  • Nancy Fox says:

    Being the guy who takes the photo is a good one. Often they’ll reciprocate, although that’s not the point.

  • Brandy Mills says:

    My favorite is always when I meet someone I follow on Twitter IRL. A few months ago I was at a charity lunch, and someone in the crowd asked a great question, and it turns out it was someone I followed on Twitter. I tweeted back to him “Great question!” which lead to “Where are you? Let’s meet up,” and ended with exchanging business cards and working on a project together a few weeks later. Oh, and a Twitter follow!

  • Brandy Mills says:

    My favorite is always when I meet someone I follow on Twitter IRL. A few months ago I was at a charity lunch, and someone in the crowd asked a great question, and it turns out it was someone I followed on Twitter. I tweeted back to him “Great question!” which lead to “Where are you? Let’s meet up,” and ended with exchanging business cards and working on a project together a few weeks later. Oh, and a Twitter follow!

  • Brandy Mills says:

    My favorite is always when I meet someone I follow on Twitter IRL. A few months ago I was at a charity lunch, and someone in the crowd asked a great question, and it turns out it was someone I followed on Twitter. I tweeted back to him “Great question!” which lead to “Where are you? Let’s meet up,” and ended with exchanging business cards and working on a project together a few weeks later. Oh, and a Twitter follow!

  • Laura says:

    What if you are a woman?! You left out Pasta Gal πŸ˜‰

  • Laura says:

    What if you are a woman?! You left out Pasta Gal πŸ˜‰

  • Laura says:

    What if you are a woman?! You left out Pasta Gal πŸ˜‰

  • Sabrina Kidwai says:

    Being an extrovert, I try to find someone who is an introvert and start talking to them. I try to engage them in conversation, and if it’s working well, then I offer to take them around and introduce them to people. I love being a connector, and I try to introduce them to folks that they would find interesting.

  • Sabrina Kidwai says:

    Being an extrovert, I try to find someone who is an introvert and start talking to them. I try to engage them in conversation, and if it’s working well, then I offer to take them around and introduce them to people. I love being a connector, and I try to introduce them to folks that they would find interesting.

  • amy parmenter says:

    I never give my business card (unless asked) but, after a bit of conversation, I’ll almost always ask for one. it says ‘i’ve enjoyed our chat’, ‘you’re important to me’ or subconsciously compliments the person in some way. MORE importantly, it allows me to have the contact info and follow up if I’d like – as opposed to offering my card and counting on the other person to do so, and risk getting lost in the shuffle.

    Amy Parmenter @parmfarm

  • amy parmenter says:

    I never give my business card (unless asked) but, after a bit of conversation, I’ll almost always ask for one. it says ‘i’ve enjoyed our chat’, ‘you’re important to me’ or subconsciously compliments the person in some way. MORE importantly, it allows me to have the contact info and follow up if I’d like – as opposed to offering my card and counting on the other person to do so, and risk getting lost in the shuffle.

    Amy Parmenter @parmfarm

  • Kate Broderick Murray says:

    A big smile and inviting posture is a good idea. If you look friendly, someone that is just as nervous as talking as you are will think you are a better target than someone frowning with their arms crossed.

  • Kate Broderick Murray says:

    A big smile and inviting posture is a good idea. If you look friendly, someone that is just as nervous as talking as you are will think you are a better target than someone frowning with their arms crossed.

  • David Crumbaugh, CPA says:

    Go to the event with the mindset of HELPING others instead of “what’s in it for me!”. Be a resource of help for the other attendees. Believe in the social law of reciprocity and enjoy!

  • David Crumbaugh, CPA says:

    Go to the event with the mindset of HELPING others instead of “what’s in it for me!”. Be a resource of help for the other attendees. Believe in the social law of reciprocity and enjoy!

  • Brenda Huettner says:

    I find it easier to start a conversation by asking about the other person. Wher are you from? Or what do you do? Or what’s your favorite part about so far? Easier to do when their at name tags, especially the kind with ribbons that indicat first-time attendee or speaker or committee member.

  • Corey Kronengold says:

    left it on your FB. Tip 3A: If you’re going to take a picture of someone, help make it a better picture. If you can clearly see that the light is going to ruin the shot, tell the people to take a step to the left. That pic of you and Strawberry would be a whole lot better if it weren’t washed out with light.

  • Brenda Huettner says:

    I find it easier to start a conversation by asking about the other person. Wher are you from? Or what do you do? Or what’s your favorite part about so far? Easier to do when their at name tags, especially the kind with ribbons that indicat first-time attendee or speaker or committee member.

  • Corey Kronengold says:

    left it on your FB. Tip 3A: If you’re going to take a picture of someone, help make it a better picture. If you can clearly see that the light is going to ruin the shot, tell the people to take a step to the left. That pic of you and Strawberry would be a whole lot better if it weren’t washed out with light.

  • Chris Reimer says:

    I suspect most comment posters here will be friends of The Shankman, but I would not be the least bit surprised if someone said something like “Boring, common sense, we already know this stuff, Peter.” More often I see such comments in Amazon book reviews, and there, like here, it makes me wonder: if you already know the secrets of networking, why aren’t you doing these things more often? Yes, such niceties seem like common sense. However, people like Peter are rare. He’s probably in the top 5 percentile of folks that put such tactics into action. I hesitate to even call them “tactics” – it’s just treating people awesomely in order to pry doors ajar. Posts like this are a necessary reminder to remember the little things and do the little things, every single day. To use the parlance of this post, don’t always try to hit a home run. Keep doing the little things, over and over and over, because they eventually DO add up.

  • Chris Reimer says:

    I suspect most comment posters here will be friends of The Shankman, but I would not be the least bit surprised if someone said something like “Boring, common sense, we already know this stuff, Peter.” More often I see such comments in Amazon book reviews, and there, like here, it makes me wonder: if you already know the secrets of networking, why aren’t you doing these things more often? Yes, such niceties seem like common sense. However, people like Peter are rare. He’s probably in the top 5 percentile of folks that put such tactics into action. I hesitate to even call them “tactics” – it’s just treating people awesomely in order to pry doors ajar. Posts like this are a necessary reminder to remember the little things and do the little things, every single day. To use the parlance of this post, don’t always try to hit a home run. Keep doing the little things, over and over and over, because they eventually DO add up.

  • Stu Opperman, APR says:

    I take the “take the photo” tip one step further by having my own digital camera and offering to get the shot with it. People assume the photo will be better quality than those taken with a phone and, when I have some PR role at the event, hope their celebrity shot will end up in a media outlet or social network site. I then get their business card, which contains the email address where I can send the photo, and also provides the opportunity to include a brief note about how nice it was to meet and suggests how we might stay connected.

  • Stu Opperman, APR says:

    I take the “take the photo” tip one step further by having my own digital camera and offering to get the shot with it. People assume the photo will be better quality than those taken with a phone and, when I have some PR role at the event, hope their celebrity shot will end up in a media outlet or social network site. I then get their business card, which contains the email address where I can send the photo, and also provides the opportunity to include a brief note about how nice it was to meet and suggests how we might stay connected.

  • Jeff says:

    Look for the guy/gal standing alone. Not only will that person be grateful to have someone to speak with, but you’ll likely get more than small talk. If that person was any good at small talk, he/she would probably already be talking with someone.

  • Nathan Lynn says:

    I always start with something that creates a laugh. Whenever I am in NYC and leaving a Starbucks for instance and walking behind someone that holds the door for me I always say, “You must be from NJ, not NY.” We both pause and laugh and I start a conversation about where I grew up and where I live now. The conversation goes everywhere and anywhere.

    One time I was headed into NYC for a Rangers game with my son and across the aisle on the train was a man with luggage and his two daughters. We were both wearing Barbour jackets, I complimented him on his good taste and asked if he wore it because it was fashionable or functional. He proceeded to show my a photo on his iPad from a hunting trip to Scotland where everyone was wearing Barbour coats. He was visiting NYC to see his son perform in a concert. He is a Chief Investment Officer based in Toronto and we exchanged cards and places to visit for an upcoming trip to Canada.

    My success story is to be that 5yr old kid that is still JUST CURIOUS AND ASK GREAT QUESTIONS ABOUT THE OTHER PERSON.

    Great post, thanks for sharing

  • Nathan Lynn says:

    I always start with something that creates a laugh. Whenever I am in NYC and leaving a Starbucks for instance and walking behind someone that holds the door for me I always say, “You must be from NJ, not NY.” We both pause and laugh and I start a conversation about where I grew up and where I live now. The conversation goes everywhere and anywhere.

    One time I was headed into NYC for a Rangers game with my son and across the aisle on the train was a man with luggage and his two daughters. We were both wearing Barbour jackets, I complimented him on his good taste and asked if he wore it because it was fashionable or functional. He proceeded to show my a photo on his iPad from a hunting trip to Scotland where everyone was wearing Barbour coats. He was visiting NYC to see his son perform in a concert. He is a Chief Investment Officer based in Toronto and we exchanged cards and places to visit for an upcoming trip to Canada.

    My success story is to be that 5yr old kid that is still JUST CURIOUS AND ASK GREAT QUESTIONS ABOUT THE OTHER PERSON.

    Great post, thanks for sharing

  • Ari says:

    Peter, great post! At networking functions or at any function where there are nametags I usually try to find something to associate with them to start a casual conversation. For example, if the person is from Boston, I may say, “Boston, I was born there, but turned into a Yankee fan.” If they are from New York, I always apologize because I grew up in New Jersey and we make a joke out of it, or if they are from somewhere I had worked an interesting case. I use the geography in their name tags to put them at ease and to find a common ground. I often find that between Boston and New York you can usually get a good Red Sox or Yankee joke in, and that’s a wonderful ice breaker.

  • Offer to introduce the people you meet to other people in your network. Send the introductory email as sooon as possible after the event.

  • Ari says:

    Peter, great post! At networking functions or at any function where there are nametags I usually try to find something to associate with them to start a casual conversation. For example, if the person is from Boston, I may say, “Boston, I was born there, but turned into a Yankee fan.” If they are from New York, I always apologize because I grew up in New Jersey and we make a joke out of it, or if they are from somewhere I had worked an interesting case. I use the geography in their name tags to put them at ease and to find a common ground. I often find that between Boston and New York you can usually get a good Red Sox or Yankee joke in, and that’s a wonderful ice breaker.

  • Offer to introduce the people you meet to other people in your network. Send the introductory email as sooon as possible after the event.

  • Diane :) says:

    You are so right! You inspire me Peter Shankman! Thankyou πŸ™‚

  • Diane :) says:

    You are so right! You inspire me Peter Shankman! Thankyou πŸ™‚

  • Dave Sniadak says:

    Keep the phone holstered. Nothing says ‘I’m here because my boss made me come’ more than constantly swiping through your phone. When I’m at an event – especially one like the ASG (Peter, you lucky dog) – I’m usually watching the action on the field, or talking about it with those I’m posted up with. Don’t be “that” guy – or gal – who’s always on your phone.

  • Dave Sniadak says:

    Keep the phone holstered. Nothing says ‘I’m here because my boss made me come’ more than constantly swiping through your phone. When I’m at an event – especially one like the ASG (Peter, you lucky dog) – I’m usually watching the action on the field, or talking about it with those I’m posted up with. Don’t be “that” guy – or gal – who’s always on your phone.

  • Michelle McCullough says:

    Don’t shove business cards in people’s faces. Don’t lead with your card. Wait until there’s a connection and an appropriate exchange of contact information.

  • Michelle McCullough says:

    Don’t shove business cards in people’s faces. Don’t lead with your card. Wait until there’s a connection and an appropriate exchange of contact information.

  • Michelle McCullough says:

    Don’t shove business cards in people’s faces. Don’t lead with your card. Wait until there’s a connection and an appropriate exchange of contact information.

  • livendive says:

    These tips are well appreciated Peter. I’ve never had much need for networking skills, but recently reached the conclusion that I need to learn how in order to take the next step forward (actually sideways, then forward) in my career. Thinking I’d be able to pick it up “on the fly’, I recently attended an event specifically for that purpose and bombed miserably. I talked to a whopping one person, and she was someone I already knew. Your tips above sound like good ways to initiate a conversation without it seeming forced or uncomfortable.

  • livendive says:

    These tips are well appreciated Peter. I’ve never had much need for networking skills, but recently reached the conclusion that I need to learn how in order to take the next step forward (actually sideways, then forward) in my career. Thinking I’d be able to pick it up “on the fly’, I recently attended an event specifically for that purpose and bombed miserably. I talked to a whopping one person, and she was someone I already knew. Your tips above sound like good ways to initiate a conversation without it seeming forced or uncomfortable.

  • livendive says:

    These tips are well appreciated Peter. I’ve never had much need for networking skills, but recently reached the conclusion that I need to learn how in order to take the next step forward (actually sideways, then forward) in my career. Thinking I’d be able to pick it up “on the fly’, I recently attended an event specifically for that purpose and bombed miserably. I talked to a whopping one person, and she was someone I already knew. Your tips above sound like good ways to initiate a conversation without it seeming forced or uncomfortable.

  • livendive says:

    These tips are well appreciated Peter. I’ve never had much need for networking skills, but recently reached the conclusion that I need to learn how in order to take the next step forward (actually sideways, then forward) in my career. Thinking I’d be able to pick it up “on the fly’, I recently attended an event specifically for that purpose and bombed miserably. I talked to a whopping one person, and she was someone I already knew. Your tips above sound like good ways to initiate a conversation without it seeming forced or uncomfortable.

  • livendive says:

    These tips are well appreciated Peter. I’ve never had much need for networking skills, but recently reached the conclusion that I need to learn how in order to take the next step forward (actually sideways, then forward) in my career. Thinking I’d be able to pick it up “on the fly’, I recently attended an event specifically for that purpose and bombed miserably. I talked to a whopping one person, and she was someone I already knew. Your tips above sound like good ways to initiate a conversation without it seeming forced or uncomfortable.

  • Hanburger says:

    I’m shy in most social settings initially. So I’ve forced myself to meet one person and then work to introduce them to other people as much as possible. It’s helped me make some great friends and kept my networking going. Part Selfish and Part Good Deed.

  • Hanburger says:

    I’m shy in most social settings initially. So I’ve forced myself to meet one person and then work to introduce them to other people as much as possible. It’s helped me make some great friends and kept my networking going. Part Selfish and Part Good Deed.

  • Hanburger says:

    I’m shy in most social settings initially. So I’ve forced myself to meet one person and then work to introduce them to other people as much as possible. It’s helped me make some great friends and kept my networking going. Part Selfish and Part Good Deed.

  • Debbie says:

    My favorite big party networking tip is to act undecided about what to drink and ask someone either at the bar or near you what they are drinking. It will lead it to small talk about it and carry on the conversation. If you order their recommendation, you can follow up with your own thoughts on the drink recommendation.

  • Debbie says:

    My favorite big party networking tip is to act undecided about what to drink and ask someone either at the bar or near you what they are drinking. It will lead it to small talk about it and carry on the conversation. If you order their recommendation, you can follow up with your own thoughts on the drink recommendation.

  • Debbie says:

    My favorite big party networking tip is to act undecided about what to drink and ask someone either at the bar or near you what they are drinking. It will lead it to small talk about it and carry on the conversation. If you order their recommendation, you can follow up with your own thoughts on the drink recommendation.

  • Debbie says:

    My favorite big party networking tip is to act undecided about what to drink and ask someone either at the bar or near you what they are drinking. It will lead it to small talk about it and carry on the conversation. If you order their recommendation, you can follow up with your own thoughts on the drink recommendation.

  • Debbie says:

    My favorite big party networking tip is to act undecided about what to drink and ask someone either at the bar or near you what they are drinking. It will lead it to small talk about it and carry on the conversation. If you order their recommendation, you can follow up with your own thoughts on the drink recommendation.

  • Kathy says:

    You never know who people know. It may not be the person you meet but their neighbor or friend who can help you in the future. Make the connection first.

  • Kathy says:

    You never know who people know. It may not be the person you meet but their neighbor or friend who can help you in the future. Make the connection first.

  • Kathy says:

    You never know who people know. It may not be the person you meet but their neighbor or friend who can help you in the future. Make the connection first.

  • Kathy says:

    You never know who people know. It may not be the person you meet but their neighbor or friend who can help you in the future. Make the connection first.

  • Kathy says:

    You never know who people know. It may not be the person you meet but their neighbor or friend who can help you in the future. Make the connection first.

  • I agree with Jeff. Talk to someone who is standing alone. Some years ago, I met a woman who became my future business partner that way.

  • I agree with Jeff. Talk to someone who is standing alone. Some years ago, I met a woman who became my future business partner that way.

  • I agree with Jeff. Talk to someone who is standing alone. Some years ago, I met a woman who became my future business partner that way.

  • I agree with Jeff. Talk to someone who is standing alone. Some years ago, I met a woman who became my future business partner that way.

  • I agree with Jeff. Talk to someone who is standing alone. Some years ago, I met a woman who became my future business partner that way.

  • “So, what brings you here?” Then listen.

  • “So, what brings you here?” Then listen.

  • “So, what brings you here?” Then listen.

  • “So, what brings you here?” Then listen.

  • “So, what brings you here?” Then listen.

  • Chris Elliott says:

    You did it, but didn’t say it was a tip. After the event, always follow up in an interesting and genuine way.

    The never do this tip. I can’t stand people who collect business cards and add me to their mailings and newsletters without asking for permission. There is a large list of people and groups I would never do business with because they used our meeting to add me to a mailing list.

  • Chris Elliott says:

    You did it, but didn’t say it was a tip. After the event, always follow up in an interesting and genuine way.

    The never do this tip. I can’t stand people who collect business cards and add me to their mailings and newsletters without asking for permission. There is a large list of people and groups I would never do business with because they used our meeting to add me to a mailing list.

  • Stephanie Jo says:

    Since high school, I’ve gone to events of all shapes and sizes, and made sure to speak to one or two people at each event by simply walking over, sticking out my hand to shake, and saying “Hi. I don’t know you. I’m Stephanie. How are you connected to (insert name of event/organization/person whose birthday party it is)?” People are generally just nervous about breaking the ice, so boom, it’s broken for them.

  • Stephanie Jo says:

    Since high school, I’ve gone to events of all shapes and sizes, and made sure to speak to one or two people at each event by simply walking over, sticking out my hand to shake, and saying “Hi. I don’t know you. I’m Stephanie. How are you connected to (insert name of event/organization/person whose birthday party it is)?” People are generally just nervous about breaking the ice, so boom, it’s broken for them.

  • Stephanie Jo says:

    Since high school, I’ve gone to events of all shapes and sizes, and made sure to speak to one or two people at each event by simply walking over, sticking out my hand to shake, and saying “Hi. I don’t know you. I’m Stephanie. How are you connected to (insert name of event/organization/person whose birthday party it is)?” People are generally just nervous about breaking the ice, so boom, it’s broken for them.

  • Stephanie Jo says:

    Since high school, I’ve gone to events of all shapes and sizes, and made sure to speak to one or two people at each event by simply walking over, sticking out my hand to shake, and saying “Hi. I don’t know you. I’m Stephanie. How are you connected to (insert name of event/organization/person whose birthday party it is)?” People are generally just nervous about breaking the ice, so boom, it’s broken for them.

  • Stephanie Jo says:

    Since high school, I’ve gone to events of all shapes and sizes, and made sure to speak to one or two people at each event by simply walking over, sticking out my hand to shake, and saying “Hi. I don’t know you. I’m Stephanie. How are you connected to (insert name of event/organization/person whose birthday party it is)?” People are generally just nervous about breaking the ice, so boom, it’s broken for them.

  • Dianne Davis says:

    If I am at an event where there is a big shot present as well as the big shot’s significant other, I start be introducing myself first to the s.o. invariably this person is standing off to the side with virtually nothing to do while everyone sucks up to the big shot. I spend time talking to them and getting to know them – really engaging. At some point this person will always introduce me and I get more face time with the big shot as suddenly I am their s.o.’s best, special friend at this event. They are always so delighted that I “saved” them from a bummer of a night and talk on the way home about that nice gal from Oklahoma! Great way to make a real connection.

    Thank you for the continued great tips. Keep up your good work!

  • Dianne Davis says:

    If I am at an event where there is a big shot present as well as the big shot’s significant other, I start be introducing myself first to the s.o. invariably this person is standing off to the side with virtually nothing to do while everyone sucks up to the big shot. I spend time talking to them and getting to know them – really engaging. At some point this person will always introduce me and I get more face time with the big shot as suddenly I am their s.o.’s best, special friend at this event. They are always so delighted that I “saved” them from a bummer of a night and talk on the way home about that nice gal from Oklahoma! Great way to make a real connection.

    Thank you for the continued great tips. Keep up your good work!

  • Dianne Davis says:

    If I am at an event where there is a big shot present as well as the big shot’s significant other, I start be introducing myself first to the s.o. invariably this person is standing off to the side with virtually nothing to do while everyone sucks up to the big shot. I spend time talking to them and getting to know them – really engaging. At some point this person will always introduce me and I get more face time with the big shot as suddenly I am their s.o.’s best, special friend at this event. They are always so delighted that I “saved” them from a bummer of a night and talk on the way home about that nice gal from Oklahoma! Great way to make a real connection.

    Thank you for the continued great tips. Keep up your good work!

  • Dianne Davis says:

    If I am at an event where there is a big shot present as well as the big shot’s significant other, I start be introducing myself first to the s.o. invariably this person is standing off to the side with virtually nothing to do while everyone sucks up to the big shot. I spend time talking to them and getting to know them – really engaging. At some point this person will always introduce me and I get more face time with the big shot as suddenly I am their s.o.’s best, special friend at this event. They are always so delighted that I “saved” them from a bummer of a night and talk on the way home about that nice gal from Oklahoma! Great way to make a real connection.

    Thank you for the continued great tips. Keep up your good work!

  • Dianne Davis says:

    If I am at an event where there is a big shot present as well as the big shot’s significant other, I start be introducing myself first to the s.o. invariably this person is standing off to the side with virtually nothing to do while everyone sucks up to the big shot. I spend time talking to them and getting to know them – really engaging. At some point this person will always introduce me and I get more face time with the big shot as suddenly I am their s.o.’s best, special friend at this event. They are always so delighted that I “saved” them from a bummer of a night and talk on the way home about that nice gal from Oklahoma! Great way to make a real connection.

    Thank you for the continued great tips. Keep up your good work!

  • billy bynes says:

    I love it when people come together and had a like minded conversation, great stuff. Keep it comming

  • billy bynes says:

    I love it when people come together and had a like minded conversation, great stuff. Keep it comming

  • billy bynes says:

    I love it when people come together and had a like minded conversation, great stuff. Keep it comming

  • billy bynes says:

    it’s good to be around smart people. I like to be the dumbest person in the plant, in learn a lot from those smart people

  • billy bynes says:

    it’s good to be around smart people. I like to be the dumbest person in the plant, in learn a lot from those smart people

  • billy bynes says:

    it’s good to be around smart people. I like to be the dumbest person in the plant, in learn a lot from those smart people

  • Emily K says:

    Sounds like you had fun! Whenever I find myself at networking events, I forget about trying to network. I feel like genuinely engaging with and looking to learn from people helps me a lot more than an impersonal introduction could.

  • Emily K says:

    Sounds like you had fun! Whenever I find myself at networking events, I forget about trying to network. I feel like genuinely engaging with and looking to learn from people helps me a lot more than an impersonal introduction could.

  • Emily K says:

    Sounds like you had fun! Whenever I find myself at networking events, I forget about trying to network. I feel like genuinely engaging with and looking to learn from people helps me a lot more than an impersonal introduction could.

  • Liz Ruff says:

    Wear something distinctive – men – a funky tie or cool (manly) bracelet. Women – jewelry, artsy pin, scarf…anything that is an easy conversation starter. I even know a guy who walks around with a rubber chicken – now that takes nerve πŸ™‚ At networking events, everyone is hungry for a conversation starter. Make it easy on them – you’ll make lots of connections!

  • Liz Ruff says:

    Wear something distinctive – men – a funky tie or cool (manly) bracelet. Women – jewelry, artsy pin, scarf…anything that is an easy conversation starter. I even know a guy who walks around with a rubber chicken – now that takes nerve πŸ™‚ At networking events, everyone is hungry for a conversation starter. Make it easy on them – you’ll make lots of connections!

  • Liz Ruff says:

    Wear something distinctive – men – a funky tie or cool (manly) bracelet. Women – jewelry, artsy pin, scarf…anything that is an easy conversation starter. I even know a guy who walks around with a rubber chicken – now that takes nerve πŸ™‚ At networking events, everyone is hungry for a conversation starter. Make it easy on them – you’ll make lots of connections!

  • Juanita says:

    Expounding on your first tip – When you get up from the table, ask “Would anyone care for another drink? I’m headed that way,” or “Can I get you anything?” It’s polite and not presumptuous. Then return to that table so it looks like you enjoyed their company even if its for a short period.

  • Juanita says:

    Expounding on your first tip – When you get up from the table, ask “Would anyone care for another drink? I’m headed that way,” or “Can I get you anything?” It’s polite and not presumptuous. Then return to that table so it looks like you enjoyed their company even if its for a short period.

  • Juanita says:

    Expounding on your first tip – When you get up from the table, ask “Would anyone care for another drink? I’m headed that way,” or “Can I get you anything?” It’s polite and not presumptuous. Then return to that table so it looks like you enjoyed their company even if its for a short period.

  • Juanita says:

    Expounding on your first tip – When you get up from the table, ask “Would anyone care for another drink? I’m headed that way,” or “Can I get you anything?” It’s polite and not presumptuous. Then return to that table so it looks like you enjoyed their company even if its for a short period.

  • Juanita says:

    Expounding on your first tip – When you get up from the table, ask “Would anyone care for another drink? I’m headed that way,” or “Can I get you anything?” It’s polite and not presumptuous. Then return to that table so it looks like you enjoyed their company even if its for a short period.

  • Carrie Bronson Roberts says:

    These are great tips. I’m very shy at networking events. I love training but not good at mixing at mixers. I’m going to incorporate a lot of these strategies to ease my discomfort in talking to those I don’t know.l

  • Carrie Bronson Roberts says:

    These are great tips. I’m very shy at networking events. I love training but not good at mixing at mixers. I’m going to incorporate a lot of these strategies to ease my discomfort in talking to those I don’t know.l

  • Carrie Bronson Roberts says:

    These are great tips. I’m very shy at networking events. I love training but not good at mixing at mixers. I’m going to incorporate a lot of these strategies to ease my discomfort in talking to those I don’t know.l

  • Carrie Bronson Roberts says:

    These are great tips. I’m very shy at networking events. I love training but not good at mixing at mixers. I’m going to incorporate a lot of these strategies to ease my discomfort in talking to those I don’t know.l

  • Carrie Bronson Roberts says:

    These are great tips. I’m very shy at networking events. I love training but not good at mixing at mixers. I’m going to incorporate a lot of these strategies to ease my discomfort in talking to those I don’t know.l

  • Chel Wolverton says:

    Don’t hide in the corner.

    Don’t be a snob. I met one of my closet friends now at a networking event. I liked her glasses and said so and we started talking about everything with the vibe of ‘am I wasting time talking to this person’.

  • Chel Wolverton says:

    Don’t hide in the corner.

    Don’t be a snob. I met one of my closet friends now at a networking event. I liked her glasses and said so and we started talking about everything with the vibe of ‘am I wasting time talking to this person’.

  • Chel Wolverton says:

    Don’t hide in the corner.

    Don’t be a snob. I met one of my closet friends now at a networking event. I liked her glasses and said so and we started talking about everything with the vibe of ‘am I wasting time talking to this person’.

  • Steph says:

    I don’t do anything unusual, except be myself…I get bored easily, so I like to ask non-work questions about favorite vacations, worst pet ever owned, favorite icebreakers, or favorite networking tip or story. Of course, I always have to have a story to share also. The conversations flows from there.

  • Steph says:

    I don’t do anything unusual, except be myself…I get bored easily, so I like to ask non-work questions about favorite vacations, worst pet ever owned, favorite icebreakers, or favorite networking tip or story. Of course, I always have to have a story to share also. The conversations flows from there.

  • Steph says:

    I don’t do anything unusual, except be myself…I get bored easily, so I like to ask non-work questions about favorite vacations, worst pet ever owned, favorite icebreakers, or favorite networking tip or story. Of course, I always have to have a story to share also. The conversations flows from there.

  • Steph says:

    I don’t do anything unusual, except be myself…I get bored easily, so I like to ask non-work questions about favorite vacations, worst pet ever owned, favorite icebreakers, or favorite networking tip or story. Of course, I always have to have a story to share also. The conversations flows from there.

  • Steph says:

    I don’t do anything unusual, except be myself…I get bored easily, so I like to ask non-work questions about favorite vacations, worst pet ever owned, favorite icebreakers, or favorite networking tip or story. Of course, I always have to have a story to share also. The conversations flows from there.

  • Sharon says:

    If there’s food to pass, offer to pass it. You get to work the room.

  • Sharon says:

    If there’s food to pass, offer to pass it. You get to work the room.

  • Sharon says:

    If there’s food to pass, offer to pass it. You get to work the room.

  • shubham says:

    The never do this tip. I can’t stand people who collect business cards
    and add me to their mailings and newsletters without asking for
    permission. There is a large list of people and groups I would never do
    business with because they used our meeting to add me to a mailing list.

  • shubham says:

    The never do this tip. I can’t stand people who collect business cards
    and add me to their mailings and newsletters without asking for
    permission. There is a large list of people and groups I would never do
    business with because they used our meeting to add me to a mailing list.

  • Cathleen Campbell Stone says:

    And thus the reason I began Living Harmony – the TRUTH is that while
    people like you and me can easily do these things, and most people
    “know” this is what needs to be done…MOST people get to networking
    events and the most they can achieve is the effort of not revealing just
    how filled with anxiety, shame and fear they really are! And what do
    all these emotions do? They pulse, scream and grow until even the most
    powerful executive and the sincerely most eager salesperson is stuck,
    doomed to leave yet another event without even a single VALID connection
    made. Here’s a real-life client example of what happens when we simply
    clear these emotions and the thoughts that go with – in this case, yet
    another no-brainer for salespeople, simply pick up the phone and call
    somebody…a powerful tool called Cold Calling – after you read this,
    now does it make sense why even the smartest people who go to Ivy League
    schools end up suffering with struggle and even failures?
    http://www.inlivingharmony.com/cold-calling-and-law-of-attraction.htm

  • Cathleen Campbell Stone says:

    And thus the reason I began Living Harmony – the TRUTH is that while
    people like you and me can easily do these things, and most people
    “know” this is what needs to be done…MOST people get to networking
    events and the most they can achieve is the effort of not revealing just
    how filled with anxiety, shame and fear they really are! And what do
    all these emotions do? They pulse, scream and grow until even the most
    powerful executive and the sincerely most eager salesperson is stuck,
    doomed to leave yet another event without even a single VALID connection
    made. Here’s a real-life client example of what happens when we simply
    clear these emotions and the thoughts that go with – in this case, yet
    another no-brainer for salespeople, simply pick up the phone and call
    somebody…a powerful tool called Cold Calling – after you read this,
    now does it make sense why even the smartest people who go to Ivy League
    schools end up suffering with struggle and even failures?
    http://www.inlivingharmony.com/cold-calling-and-law-of-attraction.htm

  • Cathleen Campbell Stone says:

    And thus the reason I began Living Harmony – the TRUTH is that while
    people like you and me can easily do these things, and most people
    “know” this is what needs to be done…MOST people get to networking
    events and the most they can achieve is the effort of not revealing just
    how filled with anxiety, shame and fear they really are! And what do
    all these emotions do? They pulse, scream and grow until even the most
    powerful executive and the sincerely most eager salesperson is stuck,
    doomed to leave yet another event without even a single VALID connection
    made. Here’s a real-life client example of what happens when we simply
    clear these emotions and the thoughts that go with – in this case, yet
    another no-brainer for salespeople, simply pick up the phone and call
    somebody…a powerful tool called Cold Calling – after you read this,
    now does it make sense why even the smartest people who go to Ivy League
    schools end up suffering with struggle and even failures?
    http://www.inlivingharmony.com/cold-calling-and-law-of-attraction.htm

  • Ana Botezatu says:

    I’m a college student currently looking for an internship in your field, and this was one of the best blogs I’ve read on your site so far. The comments are very helpful too. I tend to be very nervous in unfamiliar social situations, especially when I’m by myself, so seeing things like this definitely makes me feel a little bit better because I already incorporate some of these tips. Thank you for this blog! Really made my day before I head to class.

  • Ana Botezatu says:

    I’m a college student currently looking for an internship in your field, and this was one of the best blogs I’ve read on your site so far. The comments are very helpful too. I tend to be very nervous in unfamiliar social situations, especially when I’m by myself, so seeing things like this definitely makes me feel a little bit better because I already incorporate some of these tips. Thank you for this blog! Really made my day before I head to class.

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